Cherylynn Tsushima

Images. Movement. Words.

Monday, May 7

  • 6 notes
adamsmithshareswithyou:

Oh look, our faces in New York Magazine.
For the love of GOD, come and see me rap about my genitals.
(via The Approval Matrix - Week of May 14, 2012 — New York Magazine)

Somewhere in the mix of brilliant and lowbrow. YES.

adamsmithshareswithyou:

Oh look, our faces in New York Magazine.

For the love of GOD, come and see me rap about my genitals.

(via The Approval Matrix - Week of May 14, 2012 — New York Magazine)

Somewhere in the mix of brilliant and lowbrow. YES.

Friday, May 4

  • 1 note

Saturday, April 21

  • 5 notes

nyneofuturists:

“I’m the Boss,” from our new hip hop video game extravaganza, You are in an open field. Music by Carl Riehl, Lyrics by Kevin R. Free, Marta Rainer, and Adam Smith. 

We open in less than a week!

Get your tickets here!

Eek! Less than a week!

Also, you have 7 more hours to donate to the Rockethub campaign!

Thursday, April 19

  • 9 notes
nyneofuturists:

Test-gif from You are in an open field’s video designer, Lilianan Dirks-Goodman. 
There’s very little time left in our RocketHub Campaign - now is the time to pledge a few dollars!
amliliana:

A little Gif snippet from the video for “You are in an open field” the new play/musical/rap show about video games and identity. 
There are 48 more hours to Donate to the project!
Buy some tickets!


YES! 

nyneofuturists:

Test-gif from You are in an open field’s video designer, Lilianan Dirks-Goodman. 

There’s very little time left in our RocketHub Campaign - now is the time to pledge a few dollars!

amliliana:

A little Gif snippet from the video for “You are in an open field” the new play/musical/rap show about video games and identity. 

There are 48 more hours to Donate to the project!

Buy some tickets!

YES! 

(via heyheybetty)

  • 2 notes
  • 397 notes

livelymorgue:

Dec. 31, 1979: As the year drew to a close, “some New Yorkers responded more to the moment than to the new decade,” the original caption read. “Youngsters in an alley near East Broadway cavorted with their shadows in crisp sunlight.” The photographer remembers shooting the scene. “The light and the moment were wonderful,” he said recently. “The drying laundry made it memorable. You used to see laundry hung out to dry all the time in New York. Not anymore. Damn those dryers.” Photo: Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times

Again, children loving life.

Wednesday, April 18

  • 290 notes
timelightbox:

Untitled (Vivian Maier’s Shadow on Shoreline),ca. Late 1960s
Steven Kasher Gallery in Chelsea is exhibiting the work of secret shutterbug, Vivian Maier. Vivian Maier: Unseen Images features 35 black and white prints. When Maier died in 2009, she left behind more than 120,000 negatives and 2,000 undeveloped rolls of film. Last year, a couple hundred of these rolls, shot in the 1960s and 1970s, were finally developed. A selection of these images make their debut in this exhibition. (note: exhibition open from April 12, 2012 - May 26, 2012)
See Maier’s work on LightBox here.

To do. Anyone up for an afternoon at this exhibition, grabbing some snacks, and relaxing on the High Line?

timelightbox:

Untitled (Vivian Maier’s Shadow on Shoreline),ca. Late 1960s

Steven Kasher Gallery in Chelsea is exhibiting the work of secret shutterbug, Vivian Maier. Vivian Maier: Unseen Images features 35 black and white prints. When Maier died in 2009, she left behind more than 120,000 negatives and 2,000 undeveloped rolls of film. Last year, a couple hundred of these rolls, shot in the 1960s and 1970s, were finally developed. A selection of these images make their debut in this exhibition. (note: exhibition open from April 12, 2012 - May 26, 2012)

See Maier’s work on LightBox here.

To do. Anyone up for an afternoon at this exhibition, grabbing some snacks, and relaxing on the High Line?

  • 105 notes
theatlantic:

Does City Life Have to Mean Life Without Stars?

I remember the first time I went camping. I was 12 years old, and my swim team went on a rafting trip to the Delaware Water Gap. We got into camp in the dead of night, and I was blown away by the brightness of bodies in the night sky. I’d grown up well inside the nimbus of artificial light surrounding New York; what I remember most vividly is the feeling of disorientation as I stared up at the jam-packed firmament, streaked by the fluid, wispy smoke of the Milky Way, all of it animated from time to time by the fiery trail of a meteor. That looks so fake. Are those really all stars? How could there be so many up there, and how could I not have known about them until now? The unpolluted night sky, to me, was a revelation.
Filmmaker Ian Cheney had the opposite experience. Growing up in rural Maine, he saw the unfiltered night sky as a friend, a familiar, map-like indicator of home. It was only after he’d moved to New York as an adult that he started thinking about his connection to the night sky, and what happens when we as a species lose the reality of night - indeed, of darkness - in our daily lives. In a new documentary that’s making its way across the country, The City Dark, Cheney takes a thought-provoking and lively look at the disappearance of darkness across our planet and the disruption of our natural cycles of light and dark. […]
And it’s more than just humans who are losing the night. Nature is, too. Footage of just-hatched sea turtles trying to find their way to the ocean in Florida is one of the more heartbreaking scenes in the movie, when the disoriented hatchlings head toward the bright light of nearby apartment complexes instead of toward the moonlit water.
Light changes habitat just like a bulldozer can. In the film, Cheney says that he sleeps better up in Maine, positing that in New York he misses not just the stars in the night sky, but the dark that comes with it. From talking with leading epidemiologists and cellular biologists, he finds that the health effects of 24/7 light can be severe; studies have found almost double the incidence of breast cancer in night shift workers, and evidence points to disrupted circadian rhythms from exposure to light at night. He discovers that the World Health Organization has identified night shift work as a probable carcinogen.
Read more at The Atlantic Cities. [Image: Wicked Delicate Films]


I love city life, but I miss stargazing.

theatlantic:

Does City Life Have to Mean Life Without Stars?

I remember the first time I went camping. I was 12 years old, and my swim team went on a rafting trip to the Delaware Water Gap. We got into camp in the dead of night, and I was blown away by the brightness of bodies in the night sky. I’d grown up well inside the nimbus of artificial light surrounding New York; what I remember most vividly is the feeling of disorientation as I stared up at the jam-packed firmament, streaked by the fluid, wispy smoke of the Milky Way, all of it animated from time to time by the fiery trail of a meteor. That looks so fake. Are those really all stars? How could there be so many up there, and how could I not have known about them until now? The unpolluted night sky, to me, was a revelation.

Filmmaker Ian Cheney had the opposite experience. Growing up in rural Maine, he saw the unfiltered night sky as a friend, a familiar, map-like indicator of home. It was only after he’d moved to New York as an adult that he started thinking about his connection to the night sky, and what happens when we as a species lose the reality of night - indeed, of darkness - in our daily lives. In a new documentary that’s making its way across the country, The City DarkCheney takes a thought-provoking and lively look at the disappearance of darkness across our planet and the disruption of our natural cycles of light and dark. […]

And it’s more than just humans who are losing the night. Nature is, too. Footage of just-hatched sea turtles trying to find their way to the ocean in Florida is one of the more heartbreaking scenes in the movie, when the disoriented hatchlings head toward the bright light of nearby apartment complexes instead of toward the moonlit water.

Light changes habitat just like a bulldozer can. In the film, Cheney says that he sleeps better up in Maine, positing that in New York he misses not just the stars in the night sky, but the dark that comes with it. From talking with leading epidemiologists and cellular biologists, he finds that the health effects of 24/7 light can be severe; studies have found almost double the incidence of breast cancer in night shift workers, and evidence points to disrupted circadian rhythms from exposure to light at night. He discovers that the World Health Organization has identified night shift work as a probable carcinogen.

Read more at The Atlantic Cities. [Image: Wicked Delicate Films]

I love city life, but I miss stargazing.

  • 862 notes

kateoplis:

Walter Rosenblum

There can never be too much photography of children being exactly who they are and loving life.

  • 16,864 notes
I love those moments of synchronicity on the subway when the doors of trains heading in opposite directions open at the same time. Or those few moments when the trains are moving side by side at the same speed on their separate tracks.

I love those moments of synchronicity on the subway when the doors of trains heading in opposite directions open at the same time. Or those few moments when the trains are moving side by side at the same speed on their separate tracks.

(via mongrelminds)