Cherylynn Tsushima

Images. Movement. Words.

Saturday, June 15

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#ClearwaterFestival is a magical place. @cbbuesing #music #nature (at Croton Point Park)

#ClearwaterFestival is a magical place. @cbbuesing #music #nature (at Croton Point Park)

Friday, June 1

  • 551 notes

theatlantic:

In Focus: The American West, 150 Years Ago

In the 1860s and 70s, photographer Timothy O’Sullivan created some of the best-known images in American History. After covering the U.S. Civil War, (many of his photos appear in this earlier series), O’Sullivan joined a number of expeditions organized by the federal government to help document the new frontiers in the American West. The teams were composed of soldiers, scientists, artists, and photographers, and tasked with discovering the best ways to take advantage of the region’s untapped natural resources. O’Sullivan brought an amazing eye and work ethic, composing photographs that evoked the vastness of the West. He also documented the Native American population as well as the pioneers who were already altering the landscape. Above all, O’Sullivan captured — for the first time on film — the natural beauty of the American West in a way that would later influence Ansel Adams and thousands more photographers to come. 

See more. [Images: Timothy O’Sullivan/LOC]

Thursday, April 19

  • 170 notes
chelseawill:

Well then there’s this awesome image.

Too cool.

chelseawill:

Well then there’s this awesome image.

Too cool.

  • 337 notes

helloyoucreatives:

Two thousand dandelions were painstakingly plucked, sprayed with adhesive and loaded into a custom-made wooden transporter so they could be brought to a gallery and hung from the ceiling in a surreal installation by Regine Ramseier. The work was created as part of ArToll Summer Lab 2011. (via WebUrbanist)

So many wishes.

  • 404,569 notes
shakesphereanrag:

A picture in 365 slices. Each slice is one day of the year.

Nature is just amazing.

shakesphereanrag:

A picture in 365 slices. Each slice is one day of the year.

Nature is just amazing.

Wednesday, April 18

  • 105 notes
theatlantic:

Does City Life Have to Mean Life Without Stars?

I remember the first time I went camping. I was 12 years old, and my swim team went on a rafting trip to the Delaware Water Gap. We got into camp in the dead of night, and I was blown away by the brightness of bodies in the night sky. I’d grown up well inside the nimbus of artificial light surrounding New York; what I remember most vividly is the feeling of disorientation as I stared up at the jam-packed firmament, streaked by the fluid, wispy smoke of the Milky Way, all of it animated from time to time by the fiery trail of a meteor. That looks so fake. Are those really all stars? How could there be so many up there, and how could I not have known about them until now? The unpolluted night sky, to me, was a revelation.
Filmmaker Ian Cheney had the opposite experience. Growing up in rural Maine, he saw the unfiltered night sky as a friend, a familiar, map-like indicator of home. It was only after he’d moved to New York as an adult that he started thinking about his connection to the night sky, and what happens when we as a species lose the reality of night - indeed, of darkness - in our daily lives. In a new documentary that’s making its way across the country, The City Dark, Cheney takes a thought-provoking and lively look at the disappearance of darkness across our planet and the disruption of our natural cycles of light and dark. […]
And it’s more than just humans who are losing the night. Nature is, too. Footage of just-hatched sea turtles trying to find their way to the ocean in Florida is one of the more heartbreaking scenes in the movie, when the disoriented hatchlings head toward the bright light of nearby apartment complexes instead of toward the moonlit water.
Light changes habitat just like a bulldozer can. In the film, Cheney says that he sleeps better up in Maine, positing that in New York he misses not just the stars in the night sky, but the dark that comes with it. From talking with leading epidemiologists and cellular biologists, he finds that the health effects of 24/7 light can be severe; studies have found almost double the incidence of breast cancer in night shift workers, and evidence points to disrupted circadian rhythms from exposure to light at night. He discovers that the World Health Organization has identified night shift work as a probable carcinogen.
Read more at The Atlantic Cities. [Image: Wicked Delicate Films]


I love city life, but I miss stargazing.

theatlantic:

Does City Life Have to Mean Life Without Stars?

I remember the first time I went camping. I was 12 years old, and my swim team went on a rafting trip to the Delaware Water Gap. We got into camp in the dead of night, and I was blown away by the brightness of bodies in the night sky. I’d grown up well inside the nimbus of artificial light surrounding New York; what I remember most vividly is the feeling of disorientation as I stared up at the jam-packed firmament, streaked by the fluid, wispy smoke of the Milky Way, all of it animated from time to time by the fiery trail of a meteor. That looks so fake. Are those really all stars? How could there be so many up there, and how could I not have known about them until now? The unpolluted night sky, to me, was a revelation.

Filmmaker Ian Cheney had the opposite experience. Growing up in rural Maine, he saw the unfiltered night sky as a friend, a familiar, map-like indicator of home. It was only after he’d moved to New York as an adult that he started thinking about his connection to the night sky, and what happens when we as a species lose the reality of night - indeed, of darkness - in our daily lives. In a new documentary that’s making its way across the country, The City DarkCheney takes a thought-provoking and lively look at the disappearance of darkness across our planet and the disruption of our natural cycles of light and dark. […]

And it’s more than just humans who are losing the night. Nature is, too. Footage of just-hatched sea turtles trying to find their way to the ocean in Florida is one of the more heartbreaking scenes in the movie, when the disoriented hatchlings head toward the bright light of nearby apartment complexes instead of toward the moonlit water.

Light changes habitat just like a bulldozer can. In the film, Cheney says that he sleeps better up in Maine, positing that in New York he misses not just the stars in the night sky, but the dark that comes with it. From talking with leading epidemiologists and cellular biologists, he finds that the health effects of 24/7 light can be severe; studies have found almost double the incidence of breast cancer in night shift workers, and evidence points to disrupted circadian rhythms from exposure to light at night. He discovers that the World Health Organization has identified night shift work as a probable carcinogen.

Read more at The Atlantic Cities. [Image: Wicked Delicate Films]

I love city life, but I miss stargazing.

Thursday, March 22

  • 162 notes

kateoplis:

Lauren HermeleOn Different Groundfollows a family’s transition from NYC “post 9-11, to Pawlet, Vermont. Hermele describes how this series ‘deals with the idea of home and a sense of being in the right place,’ concepts that are hard to define, let alone convey visually. ‘Over the years, as both this project and this family’s life have  evolved, these photos continue to move beyond the boundaries of their initial post-9-11 framework onto contemplating a transplanted life and the idea of home in rural America,’ says Hermele, who was recently named one of PDN’s 30: New and Emerging Photographers to Watch.”

Monday, March 12

  • 2 notes

jakesnider:

This is a wee little promotional video I shot (with Will Van Beckum), edited and scored for the Santa Fe Photographic Workshops.  Special thanks to photographer Carlan Tapp for agreeing to appear in the video and marketing director Carrie McCarthy for producing. 

I am always floored by how talented my friends are.

(Source: harmonickinship)

  • 609 notes
anthropologie:

After being unexpectedly laid off, Kolby Kirk took it upon himself to use his newfound freedom to hike as much of the Pacific Crest Trail as he could. Over 1,700 miles later, he considered his task accomplished. On that journey, he filled over 850 pages of Moleskine journals—they offer a truly inspiring window into his voyage, and prove the ability of a journal to keep the past alive. A must see.
Image Via: The Hike Guy

Amazing.

anthropologie:

After being unexpectedly laid off, Kolby Kirk took it upon himself to use his newfound freedom to hike as much of the Pacific Crest Trail as he could. Over 1,700 miles later, he considered his task accomplished. On that journey, he filled over 850 pages of Moleskine journals—they offer a truly inspiring window into his voyage, and prove the ability of a journal to keep the past alive. A must see.

Image Via: The Hike Guy

Amazing.

(Source: anthropologie)

Thursday, March 8

  • 1,414 notes