Cherylynn Tsushima

Images. Movement. Words.

Thursday, April 19

  • 3 notes

Confession: I miss The Berkeley Beacon

I miss putting together the paper on Wednesday nights in the basement (read: dungeon) of Piano Row. I miss Monday night staff meetings and critiques with Ric. I miss the uber-motivated and hard-working editors, writers, and photographers. I miss picking up the paper every Thursday morning. I miss dancing to the latest guilty pleasure when everyone takes a five minute (in)sanity break. I miss being known as PC (aka Politically Correct)…okay, not so much that one. I miss trying to think of raunchy titles for NIBs. I miss taking photos and editing them down to find the most dynamic image to accompany a story. I miss the weekly miracle of helping a newspaper come into being and knowing it was based on the work of my fellow Emersonians.

I still feel an insane surge of pride for my college newspaper. I was so impressed when they rolled out their new HTML5 website. It makes me happy that even after I’ve graduated, my photographs get used. (Yeah, archives.) For present Beaconites, I hope you know that this alumni is proud to see that the legacy of accurate reporting, distinct visuals, perfect AP Style, and innovative work continues.

Monday, February 20

  • 500 notes

Monday, January 9

  • 73 notes

Tuesday, November 8

  • 28 notes
futurejournalismproject:

Multimedia in Journalism: An Interview with theTimes’ Amy Harmon
Amy Harmon recently published a piece where she followed a young man with autism for a year. The Times then helped add other multimedia elements to this story. You can find the link here. The following is an interview with Harmon about the process. 

MZ: How did the idea of integrating all that multimedia into a narrative piece come to be? Was this the first time the Times tried anything like it?
AH: The Times uses multimedia to tell stories all the time, we even won an Emmy for one cool approach to this recently. But what I think is so innovative about the “quick links” that my colleagueJosh Williams invented for the autism story is precisely the integration that you are asking about. In an immersion-narrative like this one, the whole point for me, as the writer, is to get readers hooked enough to keep reading to the end. I struggled for weeks, over many drafts, to do that with this one. I hoped they would want to know: will Justin manage to secure a place for himself in the world beyond high school? Will he find a job that uses his artistic talent? Will he remain friendless? The last thing I wanted was to add multimedia distractions, no matter how whizzy. So to me, the beauty of the quick links is that they don’t take you away from the story. They don’t open a new tab from which you may never return, they don’t introduce a dimension of plot or character that is tangential to my compulsively-labored-over text. But they DO bring the story to life in a visceral way that my words do not, and perhaps never could, even if I had longer to perfect them, or was a more gifted writer.
As to how the idea came about: it grew out of the editing process, pretty late in the game. This was not a case where we sat down ahead of time and tried to conceive of a new way to convey information. But one thing we had done, which is pretty standard now, is produce a short video that would accompany the story on our Web site. And it was when Glenn Kramon, the paper’s enterprise editor, saw the video that he asked whether it would be possible for readers to see and hear Justin as they read the article online. The video itself was great, we all loved how the producers had told Justin’s story. But it was also obvious that seeing and hearing Justin, even in just the raw footage, Glenn was able to grasp the nature of his autism with a clarity that he had never had in reading my written descriptions. And he didn’t want readers to have to watch the stand-alone, seven-minute video to have that experience. He wanted it sprinkled into the story. It seemed obvious once he said it, but since none of us had ever seen anything like that, I was sort of doubtful that it could be done, at least in time for my story to run.
At our next meeting, though, Andrew DeVigal, who heads the multimedia team, came with Josh Williams, a member of his staff. Josh instantly grasped what we wanted, and it was only a couple of days later that he showed us the first iteration of the links. Josh had been involved in developing much fancier stuff, and he didn’t think this was such a big deal. But I did. Maybe because it is still essentially a familiar format, rather than a completely new one, I felt like I could work within it, and it gave me this totally new way to make the story better.


Check out the interview then go to the NYT article.
Read it, look at the photos, watch the videos, click the links. There is so much information and depth to the reporting. This is how multimedia should be done.
Also, everything about this project is why I love journalism.

futurejournalismproject:

Multimedia in Journalism: An Interview with theTimes’ Amy Harmon

Amy Harmon recently published a piece where she followed a young man with autism for a year. The Times then helped add other multimedia elements to this story. You can find the link here. The following is an interview with Harmon about the process. 

MZ: How did the idea of integrating all that multimedia into a narrative piece come to be? Was this the first time the Times tried anything like it?

AH: The Times uses multimedia to tell stories all the time, we even won an Emmy for one cool approach to this recently. But what I think is so innovative about the “quick links” that my colleagueJosh Williams invented for the autism story is precisely the integration that you are asking about. In an immersion-narrative like this one, the whole point for me, as the writer, is to get readers hooked enough to keep reading to the end. I struggled for weeks, over many drafts, to do that with this one. I hoped they would want to know: will Justin manage to secure a place for himself in the world beyond high school? Will he find a job that uses his artistic talent? Will he remain friendless? The last thing I wanted was to add multimedia distractions, no matter how whizzy. So to me, the beauty of the quick links is that they don’t take you away from the story. They don’t open a new tab from which you may never return, they don’t introduce a dimension of plot or character that is tangential to my compulsively-labored-over text. But they DO bring the story to life in a visceral way that my words do not, and perhaps never could, even if I had longer to perfect them, or was a more gifted writer.

As to how the idea came about: it grew out of the editing process, pretty late in the game. This was not a case where we sat down ahead of time and tried to conceive of a new way to convey information. But one thing we had done, which is pretty standard now, is produce a short video that would accompany the story on our Web site. And it was when Glenn Kramon, the paper’s enterprise editor, saw the video that he asked whether it would be possible for readers to see and hear Justin as they read the article online. The video itself was great, we all loved how the producers had told Justin’s story. But it was also obvious that seeing and hearing Justin, even in just the raw footage, Glenn was able to grasp the nature of his autism with a clarity that he had never had in reading my written descriptions. And he didn’t want readers to have to watch the stand-alone, seven-minute video to have that experience. He wanted it sprinkled into the story. It seemed obvious once he said it, but since none of us had ever seen anything like that, I was sort of doubtful that it could be done, at least in time for my story to run.

At our next meeting, though, Andrew DeVigal, who heads the multimedia team, came with Josh Williams, a member of his staff. Josh instantly grasped what we wanted, and it was only a couple of days later that he showed us the first iteration of the links. Josh had been involved in developing much fancier stuff, and he didn’t think this was such a big deal. But I did. Maybe because it is still essentially a familiar format, rather than a completely new one, I felt like I could work within it, and it gave me this totally new way to make the story better.

Check out the interview then go to the NYT article.

Read it, look at the photos, watch the videos, click the links. There is so much information and depth to the reporting. This is how multimedia should be done.

Also, everything about this project is why I love journalism.

(via futurejournalismproject)

Wednesday, August 17

  • 35 notes

Tuesday, July 27

One of the Rewards

A story about a skid row musician who recently played for President Obama is the leading story on LATimes.com.  The article is part of Steve Lopez’s column, which means he is quite prevalent in the story.  I’m not usually a big fan of columns for this very reason.  I much prefer the fly on the wall type of story-telling.  However, I love the way Lopez has had a relationship with Nathaniel Ayers.  I’ve read through a few of his other articles related to Ayers and have found them truly inspiring.  I’d definitely say the desire to do good and to help others is one of the reasons I love journalism.  Articles like these serve as a great reminder of how much of an impact a journalist can have.  Thank you Los Angeles Times for once again reminding me why I love my major.

Saturday, July 10