Cherylynn Tsushima

Images. Movement. Words.

Friday, March 2

  • 219 notes
kateoplis:

Newsgirls coming through the alley. The smallest girl has been selling for 2 years. Hartford, Connecticut, 1909

It’s a fine life, carrying the banner through it all!
A mighty fine life, carrying the banner tough and tall!
—-
My brother has informed me that Alex Wong will be in Newsies on Broadway. YES. Also, I will be kicking myself for a while for not hearing about that audition until the day after it happened.

kateoplis:

Newsgirls coming through the alley. The smallest girl has been selling for 2 years. Hartford, Connecticut, 1909

It’s a fine life, carrying the banner through it all!

A mighty fine life, carrying the banner tough and tall!

—-

My brother has informed me that Alex Wong will be in Newsies on Broadway. YES. Also, I will be kicking myself for a while for not hearing about that audition until the day after it happened.

Friday, February 3

  • 117 notes

guardian:
Winter weather around the northern hemisphere 
A woman walks through the Cimetiere des Rois in Geneva, SwitzerlandPhotograph: Salvatore Di Nolfi/AP
Temperatures have plunged in parts of Europe and further east. Among the hardest hit countries is Ukraine, where as many as 30 people have died on snow-covered streets, in hospitals and in their own homes in the past four days. Parts of France, Germany, the Netherlands, Italy and Turkey have all seen heavy snowfalls
G2: How to look good while freezing
Flickr pictures of the winter weather 

It’s kind of screwed up (read: insensitive) that the main graf is about how 30 people have died because of the cold weather and the next link is about “looking good while freezing”. 
On a very different note, I really love the photograph.

guardian:

Winter weather around the northern hemisphere

A woman walks through the Cimetiere des Rois in Geneva, SwitzerlandPhotograph: Salvatore Di Nolfi/AP

Temperatures have plunged in parts of Europe and further east. Among the hardest hit countries is Ukraine, where as many as 30 people have died on snow-covered streets, in hospitals and in their own homes in the past four days. Parts of France, Germany, the Netherlands, Italy and Turkey have all seen heavy snowfalls

It’s kind of screwed up (read: insensitive) that the main graf is about how 30 people have died because of the cold weather and the next link is about “looking good while freezing”. 

On a very different note, I really love the photograph.

  • 87 notes

theatlanticvideo:

Transit: A Photojournalist’s Quest to Tell the Stories of People on the Run

Espen Rasmussen, an Oslo-based photographer, has spent seven years documenting displaced people around the world for his Transit project, a multimedia work that includes photography, video, a website, and an exhibition at the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo. The videos blend Rasmussen’s photographs and interviews, edited together by Anna Stevens at Panos Pictures, to tell the personal stories of people coping in the wake of devastating events. In this segment, he interviews women in a refugee camp in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where 1.9 million people have been displaced. The photographer reflects on the ongoing project in an interview with the Atlantic Video channel.

(via theatlantic)

Monday, January 9

  • 73 notes

Monday, January 2

  • 1,465 notes
photojojo:

We’ve seen a lot of 365 projects, but David Talley’s really took it to the next level, well done. 

Love this.

photojojo:

We’ve seen a lot of 365 projects, but David Talley’s really took it to the next level, well done. 

Love this.

Friday, September 30

  • 82 notes

Monday, September 19

  • 28 notes
futurejournalismproject:


 

A Unique Paywall Plan in Boston

Paid and free, side by side: The Boston Globe became the latest news organization to institute an online paywall this week, but it did so in an unprecedented way that should be interesting to watch: The newspaper created a separate paid site,BostonGlobe.com, to run alongside its existing free site, Boston.com. PaidContent has the pertinent details: A single price ($3.99 a week), and Boston.com gets most of the breaking news and sports, while BostonGlobe.com gets most of the newspaper content.
As the Globe told Poynter’s Jeff Sonderman, the two sites were designed with two different types of readers in mind: One who has a deep appreciation for in-depth journalism and likes to read stories start-to-finish, and another who reads news casually and briefly and may be more concerned about entertainment or basic information than journalism per se.
The first thing that caught many people’s attention was new site’s design — simple, clean, and understated. Tech blogger John Gruber gave it a thumbs-up, and news design guru Mario Garcia called it ”probably the most significant new website design in a long time.” The Lab’s Joshua Benton identified the biggest reasons it looks so clean: Far fewer links and ads.
Benton (in the most comprehensive post on the new site) also emphasized a less noticeable but equally important aspect of BostonGlobe.com’s design: It adjusts to fit just about any browser size, which reduces the need for mobile apps, making life easier for programmers and, as j-prof Dan Kennedy noted at the Lab, a way around the cut of app fees required by Apple and others. If the Globe’s people “have figured out a way not to share their hard-earned revenues with gatekeepers such as Apple and Amazon, then they will have truly performed a service for the news business — and for journalism,” Kennedy said.
Of course, the Globe could launch the most brilliantly conceived news site on the web, but it won’t be a success unless enough people pay for it. Poynter’sSonderman (like Kennedy) was skeptical of their ability to do that, though as the Atlantic’s Rebecca Rosen pointed out, the Globe’s plan may be aimed as much at retaining print subscribers as making money off the web. The Washington Post’s Erik Wemple wondered if readers will find enough at BostonGlobe.com that’s not at Boston.com to make the site worth their money.

Via Nieman Lab 

Wait. Stop it.
The Boston Globe used to be one of the most cluttered and user-unfriendly newspaper websites, but it was beautifully and gloriously free. Now, for a price, it’s easy to read and squeaky clean. This makes me miss Emerson College because my journalism classes would be having really interesting debates about this change.

futurejournalismproject:

A Unique Paywall Plan in Boston

Paid and free, side by side: The Boston Globe became the latest news organization to institute an online paywall this week, but it did so in an unprecedented way that should be interesting to watch: The newspaper created a separate paid site,BostonGlobe.com, to run alongside its existing free site, Boston.com. PaidContent has the pertinent details: A single price ($3.99 a week), and Boston.com gets most of the breaking news and sports, while BostonGlobe.com gets most of the newspaper content.

As the Globe told Poynter’s Jeff Sonderman, the two sites were designed with two different types of readers in mind: One who has a deep appreciation for in-depth journalism and likes to read stories start-to-finish, and another who reads news casually and briefly and may be more concerned about entertainment or basic information than journalism per se.

The first thing that caught many people’s attention was new site’s design — simple, clean, and understated. Tech blogger John Gruber gave it a thumbs-up, and news design guru Mario Garcia called it ”probably the most significant new website design in a long time.” The Lab’s Joshua Benton identified the biggest reasons it looks so clean: Far fewer links and ads.

Benton (in the most comprehensive post on the new site) also emphasized a less noticeable but equally important aspect of BostonGlobe.com’s design: It adjusts to fit just about any browser size, which reduces the need for mobile apps, making life easier for programmers and, as j-prof Dan Kennedy noted at the Lab, a way around the cut of app fees required by Apple and others. If the Globe’s people “have figured out a way not to share their hard-earned revenues with gatekeepers such as Apple and Amazon, then they will have truly performed a service for the news business — and for journalism,” Kennedy said.

Of course, the Globe could launch the most brilliantly conceived news site on the web, but it won’t be a success unless enough people pay for it. Poynter’sSonderman (like Kennedy) was skeptical of their ability to do that, though as the Atlantic’s Rebecca Rosen pointed out, the Globe’s plan may be aimed as much at retaining print subscribers as making money off the web. The Washington Post’s Erik Wemple wondered if readers will find enough at BostonGlobe.com that’s not at Boston.com to make the site worth their money.

Via Nieman Lab 

Wait. Stop it.

The Boston Globe used to be one of the most cluttered and user-unfriendly newspaper websites, but it was beautifully and gloriously free. Now, for a price, it’s easy to read and squeaky clean. This makes me miss Emerson College because my journalism classes would be having really interesting debates about this change.

(via futurejournalismproject)

Thursday, September 15

  • 1,527 notes
motherjones:

Chart of the Day: The amount that students owe quintupled between 2000 and 2011. For more, check out our MoJo College Guide.

Oh, wow. This is terrifying.

motherjones:

Chart of the Day: The amount that students owe quintupled between 2000 and 2011. For more, check out our MoJo College Guide.

Oh, wow. This is terrifying.

(via npr)

Monday, September 12

  • 887 notes

Wednesday, September 7

  • 698 notes
nprfreshair:

newsmediatumblrs:

A directory of news organizations on Tumblr.
Excuse if incomplete — drop a link or tell me what’s what.
Update: Some new info right here. And please follow the blog to get corrections and additions! I’m not planning on building any notifications into that table.

Philly represent!

Follow, follow, follow.

nprfreshair:

newsmediatumblrs:

A directory of news organizations on Tumblr.

Excuse if incomplete — drop a link or tell me what’s what.

Update: Some new info right here. And please follow the blog to get corrections and additions! I’m not planning on building any notifications into that table.

Philly represent!

Follow, follow, follow.